Did you go to the Purim Concert?

Purim: Megilla Read­ings, Balls and Con­certs (oh my; so many options)

As long ago as 1864, New York Jews attend­ed Purim Balls, a tra­di­tion now main­tained for the past 32 years at The Jew­ish Muse­um. And, not only in New York, but also Bev­er­ly Hills, CA, Min­neapo­lis, MN and Akron, OH where young women are pre­sent­ed as […]

face to face

שלום button produced by habonim

vir­tu­al and real life rela­tion­ships

If you are read­ing this, you know that I believe in the val­ue of “vir­tu­al” or “Inter­net rela­tion­ships”, though not of the inti­mate kind. In fact, it’s writ­ten over there in the upper left cor­ner that “For many years I have worked hard, and strug­gled with mas­ter­ing vir­tuous. Now, in addi­tion, I’m work­ing […]

#blogelul : counting

love

the num­bers’ game
[Note: not all of the but­tons used to illus­trat­ed this game rep­re­sent the con­cept expressed in the num­bers; some are used because they dis­play that num­ber.]

The chil­dren played by the shore, allow­ing the ball to bounce light­ly on their fin­ger tips before they popped it over to the oth­er side of the line. […]

what would dad think?

poli­ty not piety™

Yes, that’s a “trade­mark” sym­bol there. Why not? I con­tin­ue to tell peo­ple that I came to the rab­binate out of “poli­ty” not “piety”. My involve­ment was as a com­mu­ni­ty orga­niz­er. A quick check on Google indi­cates that I’m near­ly the only per­son to have used it… and, at that, sig­nif­i­cant­ly more fre­quent­ly.

nathan hurvitz

Our father died 25 […]

swann song

jews and judaism in amer­i­can pop­u­lar cul­ture .01
now, …with har­vey and sheila!

There was a time, it feels strange to write this… a gen­er­a­tion ago, when being Jew­ish was very “in”. The thing to be in Amer­i­ca. Amer­i­cans con­tin­ue to, even increas­ing­ly, con­vert to Judaism in the 2000s. How­ev­er, back in “The Six­ties” some forms of Jew­ish cul­ture […]

Elul Homework 2 (I've done that too!)

con­fir­ma­tion and ver­i­fi­ca­tion

Some­times we think that we are the only per­son who has done such ter­ri­ble things to oth­ers. It can be lib­er­at­ing and for­giv­ing for us, and those oth­ers like us, to learn that we are not alone. It also often feels good to have oth­ers “sign off” on rec­og­niz­ing that we may have […]

th Century Jewish Cultural Hero">19th Century Jewish Cultural Hero

I col­lect (Amer­i­can) Juda­ic lapel but­tons.
I have approx­i­mate­ly 3000 unique items. Each one rep­re­sents a dif­fer­ent moment in the Amer­i­can Jew­ish expe­ri­ence.
Peri­od­i­cal­ly I share them here.

My uncle was named after Mendele Mocher Sforim (the “Grand­fa­ther of Yid­dish lit­er­a­ture”). His old­er broth­er, my father was always called Nathan or Nate, though he was named Nechemia. I’ve not found any­one […]